14 Comments
Jan 16Liked by Kristin Haakenson

As someone who grew up in a tradition that never mentioned the Saints or the feasts, or the church calendar at all, having a sincere desire to "do it all" can sometimes feel like drinking from a fire hose. I'm doing my best to be content to only learn what I am actually able to put into practice. The difficulty for me comes, not from a fear of missing out, necessarily, but a sincere desire to connect to the church at large, because I often feel so disconnected from the majority of my brothers and sisters. Help me, Lord, to find rest in you, as you walk with me through this season of discovery.

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Jan 16Liked by Kristin Haakenson

Kristin, thank you as always for the thought, heart, and beauty you put into writing these gems!

Some ways we adapt the liturgical celebrations to our time and place -- these are things we did at my church growing up, or that I've seen done in other churches:

- Put a few willow branches in water at the beginning of Lent. By Easter, they will have budded all over with green leaves. A perfect metaphor for the enlivening of our souls.

- Use greenery from local trees or bushes to decorate for Pentecost (again, the life imagery: the descent of the Holy Spirit, the Giver of Life).

- (This one isn't specific to NorCal, but more so the 21st century): bless cars on Prophet Elijah's feastday on July 20 (he went up to heaven in a fiery chariot...)

- Bless apples on Christmas ("Jesus Christ the apple tree")

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Sep 27, 2023Liked by Kristin Haakenson

I love this. I could never do it all. We have moved a lot, so we don't have a close community, but I try to make the best of it. Having lived in the West Coast, Midwest, and now South, I really lean into the culture and seasons the way I see the church doing through the development of the liturgical year. It can be both fun and challenging to adapt things! For example, there's ne'er a White Christmas in Southern California! And my town in the Midwest was super Polish, so I could enjoy paczki's for Mardi Gras at any one of a dozen shops. My new city has Korean, West Syriac, East Syriac, Vietnamese, and Latin parishes all within 35 minutes, so my interest in global cultural traditions is piqued! It might go on my bucket list to visit as many liturgies as possible in the spirit of "every tongue, tribe, and nation."

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I love the idea that we can allow ourselves to be a little more flexible in celebrating the liturgical year. It's one of the things I love about the church--open to so many different ways of enriching our faith. I first thought about this in terms of art but as a curious new follower of the liturgical year this is a breath of fresh air.

I was just reading about a Christian who could not read the Little House Series because Laura didn't pledge to be submissive to her husband. What a pity to be so rigid in your faith.

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Thank you for this, Kristin: "Online access makes that easy to forget. Despite our best efforts, we see the onslaught of daily celebration and feel like we, too, need to do it all - or we’re somehow failing. I call rubbish on this! Let’s build a culture of liturgical curiosity, not of completionism. A balance of fixed & flexible, universal & local." Well said. I used to become overwhelmed attempting to honor each and every festival with my little one...eventually I recognized being held hostage by hashtag 'holidays' was not the foundation on which I wished to build my family's traditions (although, I just found some photos of my little one making a Martinmas lantern and it made me a little bit weepy). Your posts are nudging me to revisit many of our early celebrations.

Also, is it weird that I used cacophony in a draft this morning? I used it to describe my windchimes! ♡

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Very interesting and I’m re-reading tonight!

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Great! I've made a start by mapping out November in both 1962 and 1970 calendars. I will be adding all the british saints ( I'm composing a lost very slowly) with a smattering of benedictine saints too. Lots to go at with the seasonal things too!

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